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Livres 1.
Lieu, Judith M. (1951-....) / Westminster John Knox Press / cop. 2008
Ressources électroniques 2.
1st ed. 2006. / Springer Berlin Heidelberg / 2006Résumé
Ressources électroniques 3.
British education : or, the source of the disorders of Great Britain. Being An Essay towards proving, that the Immorality, Ignorance, and false Taste, which so generally prevail, are the natural and necessary Consequences of the present defective System of Education. With an attempt to shew, that a revival of the art of speaking, and the study of our own language, might contribute, in a great measure, to the cure of those evils. In three parts. I. Of the Use of these Studies to Religion, and Morality; as also, to the Support of the British Constitution. II. Their absolute Necessity in order to refine, ascertain, and fix the English Language. III. Their Use in the Cultivation of the Imitative Arts: shewing, that were the Study of Oratory made a necessary Branch of the Education of Youth, Poetry, Music, Painting, and Sculpture, might arrive at as high a Pitch of Perfection in England, on ever they did in Athens or Rome. By Thomas Sheridan, A. M
Sheridan, Thomas (1719-1788) / The second edition. / Cengage Gale / 2009
Ressources électroniques 4.
British education : or, the source of the disorders of Great Britain. Being an essay towards proving, that the immorality, ignorance, and false taste, which so generally prevail, are the natural and necessary consequences of the present defective system of education. With An Attempt to shew, that a Revival of the Art of Speaking, and the Study of our own Language, might contribute, in a great measure, to the Cure of those Evils. In three parts. I. Of the Use of these Studies to Religion, and Morality; as also, to the Support of the British Constitution. II. Their absolute Necessity in order to refine, ascertain, and fix the English Language. III. Their Use in the Cultivation of the Imitative Arts: shewing, that were the Study of Oratory made a necessary Branch of the Education of Youth, Poetry, Music, Painting, and Sculpture, might arrive at as high a Pitch of Perfection in England, as ever they did in Athens or Rome. By Thomas Sheridan, A. M
Sheridan, Thomas (1719-1788) / Cengage Gale / 2009
Ressources électroniques 5.
Brand, Mark / 1st ed. 2010. / Springer Berlin Heidelberg / 2010Résumé
Ressources électroniques 6.
Wotton's short view of George Hickes's grammatico-critical and archeological treasure of the ancient northern-languages, : with some notes, by a Lover of the ancient Northern-Literature, and an appendix to the notes, Faithfully and Intirely translated into English from the Latin original, by Maurice Shelton, Of Barningham-Hall in the County of Suffolk, Esquire, One of his Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the said County, &c. To which are added by the same Translator, Other Curious and Proper Notes for a further Illustration of the Text, A Short Appendix of Notes of Correction, &c. And a Dedication to the Right Honourable James Reynolds, Esq; Lord Chief Baron of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer, at Westminster. No sort of Learning can be a Burthen to any Man; that certainly is the most Useful and Pleasant which relates to the Language, Laws, and Customs of our own Country, &c
Wotton, William (1666-1727) / Cengage Gale / 2009
Ressources électroniques 7.
Wotton's short view of George Hickes's grammatico-critical and archeological treasury of the ancient northern languages, : with some notes, by a lover of the ancient northern literature, and an appendix to the notes, faithfully and intirely translated into English from the Latin original, by Maurice Shelton, of Barmingham Hall in the county of Suffolk, Esquire, one of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the said county, &c. To which are added by the same translator. Other curious and proper notes for a further illustration of the text, a short appendix of notes of correction, &c. and a dedication to the Right Honourable James Retnolds, Esq; Lord Chief Baron of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer, at West-Minster. No sort of learning can be a burthen to any man; that certainly is the most useful and pleasant, which relates to the language, laws, and customs of our own country, &c
Wotton, William (1666-1727) / The second edition, with emendations and large additions, .. / Cengage Gale / 2009
Ressources électroniques 8.
British education : or, the source of the disorders of Great Britain. Being an essay towards proving, that the immorality, ignorance, and false taste, which so generally prevail, are the natural and necessary consequences of the present defective system of education. With a attempt to shew, that a revival of the art of speaking, and the study of our own language, might contribute, in great measure, to the cure of those evils. In three parts. I. Of the use of these studies to religion, and morality; as also, to the support of the British constitution. II. Their absolute necessity in order to refine, ascertain, and fix the English language. III. Their use in the cultivation of the imitative arts: shewing, that were the study of oratory made a necessary branch of the education of youth; poetry, musick, painting, and sculpture, might arrive at as high a pitch of perfection in England, as ever they did in Athens or Rome. By Thomas Sheridan, A.M
Sheridan, Thomas (1719-1788) / Cengage Gale / 2009
Livres 9.
Greenwood Press / 1996
Ressources électroniques 10.
The strange voyage and adventures of Domingo Gonsales, : to the world in the moon. Containing an account of the Island of St. Hellena; the Place where he resided some Years in, and where he planned this Wonderful Voyage; his entering on Board one of the Homeward-Bound East-India Ships for Spain; their running on the Rocks near the Pike of Teneriff, to avoid an English Squadron of Ships, that were in Pursuit of the Spanish Fleet; Gonsales had just Time to fix his Machine, which carried him in Safety to the Pike of Teneriff, having rested his Gansas on the Mountain, whence was pursued by the Savages; when giving the Signal to his Birds, they arose in the Air with him for their Journey to the Moon: The wonderful Apparitions and Devils he met with in his Progress; their Temptations to him, which he avoided, and their supplying him with choice Provisions; his leaving this Hellish Crew, and proceedings on his Voyage to the Moon; his safe Arrival there; the Manners, Customs, and Language of the Emperors, Kings, Princes and People: His short Stay there, to the great Grief of the Lunars; the inestimable Presents in Jewels the Author received at his Departure; his repassing to our Earthly Globe again, and was set down in China by his Birds; his being taken for a Magician by the Country People, and preserved from their Fury by a Chinese Mandarin; his going aboard an India Ship bound to Europe; his safe Arrival in his own Country, where he made his Discoveries to the King of Spain, who held several Cabinet Councils to deliberate on a proper Use to be made of these Discoveries. With a description of the Pike of Teneriff, as travelled up by some English merchants
Godwin, Francis (1562-1633) / The second edition. / Cengage Gale / 2009