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Ressources électroniques 1.
Hill, Rowland (1744-1833) / Cengage Gale / 2009
Ressources électroniques 2.
Cengage Gale / 2009
Ressources électroniques 3.
To all gentlemen, ladies and others, The intent of Publishing this Book in this Nature is, that each Person shall first have the Reading of it through, and then Consider the weighty Matters herein Contain'd. The intent being only for the Publick Good, as to the Preservation of Life in Time of Need. It having met with that Reception in the Kingdom of England, that there was upwards of Four Hundred Thousand of them Distributed. So that in Case, after Twelve Hours Time to Peruse it over, this Jewel shall not be thought worthy of the Price of one single Penny, and to be lockt up in your Cabinet, as the most estimable Riches in your Family; Praying to God so favour this Kingdom, that there may be never occasion to make use of it. Be pleas'd to keep it Clean, and return it to the Bearer. N. B. Since the nations of Great Britain are equally Concern'd, And are under the apprehensions of fear, of that contagious distemper the plague spreading, by the Eggs being scatter'd as the Weather shall become Warm, in this year ensuing 1722. which the two famous Citys in England and Ireland, (viz.) London and Dublin, too severly felt the smart, let it not be forgot. Therefore, as the present wise government of the Kingdom of England. thought fit that the Learne College on Physitians of London, should prescribe remedys for every family to be their own physicians, in the Day of Tribulation and Afflictions, and time of Need; when no one will attend them. They have in this book, without any Reserve to themselves, Candidly set forth, the true experienc d remedies made us e of in the Year of the great Sickness 1665 in London, where-with so many Thousands were Preserv'd, of all that took it, not one Died, which was done by Order of the King and Council; with the true Receipts and Rules for its prevention and Cure. Courteous Reader, Consider why the same Measures taken in England, for the Prevention and Cure of that Pestilential Distemper call'd the Plague; may not be as useful in this Kingdom, since if you Compare the terrible Infection now rageing in France with that in Dublin in the Year 1652. and that in London in the Year 1665. you will find them equal the same; and therefore ought to be kept in every Family, to be ready at Hand, when no one will attend them. Dedicated to the Honourable Sir Hans Sloane, Knight and Baronet, President to the famous College of Physicians in London
Cengage Gale / 2009
Ressources électroniques 4.
The grammarian's geography and astronomy ancient and modern, exemplified in the use of the globes terraqueous and cælestial. In which all the Terms of Art, Parts of the Globes, and Problems thereon to be performed, with the Use of Maps, are so plainly and methodically consider'd and treated of, as scarce ever to be forgot when once taught and shown by the diligent Tutor. In two parts. Particularly adapted to the Capacities of young Gentlemen studying the Classicks; as well as, useful and entertaining to all others, who; not having had Opportunity of acquainting themselves with Mathematical Calculations, are yet desirous of some Knowledge of the Earth and Heavens. The geographical part comprehending the ancient and modern names, Situation, Government, Religion, Bounds, Dimensions, Length; and Breadth of most Places in the World; including Land and Water, namely, Continents, Islands, Peninsulas, Isthmus's, Promontories, Capes, Coasts, Mountains, with Oceans, Seas, Lakes, Straits, Gulfs, Rivers, and Countries, Kingdoms, Cities, and Towns; with the Latitude and Longitude of the most principal Parts, and their Bearing and Distance from London; in View of the Latin and Greek Classicks, Homer, Virgil, Herodotus, Justin; Xenophon, Caesar, Plutarch, Livy, Thucidydes, Sallust, Dionysius Periegetes, Pausanias, Josephus, Eusebius, Silius Italicus, Lucan, Florus, Nepos, Eutropius, Quintus Curtius, and the rest: With the Adventures, Voyages, and Travels of Ulysses, Aeneas, Nebuchadnezzar, Cyrus, Alexander the Great, Hannibal, Julius Caesar, our Saviour Jesus Christ, St. Paul, the rest of the Apostles, and many others in both sacred and profane History. The astronomical part containing a description of the laws, Order, Number, Names, Distances, Magnitudes, Motions, and Appearances of the Heavenly Bodies, Sun, Moon, Stars, and Planets, with the Problems belonging thereto; an Account of the several Systems of the Universe, and a Defence of the true Solar One; the History of the Rise, Progress and present Perfection of Astronomy; the Classical Stories relating to the Planets Signs and Constellations delineated on the Celestial Globe. With a Dramatick Epilogue called Caelum Reformatum. The Whole illustrated with necessary Maps and Schemes neatly engraved on Copper. By John Holmes, Master of the Publick Grammar School, in Holt, Norfolk
Holmes, John (1703-1759) / Cengage Gale / 2009
Ressources électroniques 5.
A Complete account of the ceremonies observed in the coronations of the Kings and Queens of England. : Containing, I. The form of the royal letters of summons, sent to the peers and peeresses, to attend the solemnity of the coronation. II. The usual disposition of the horse and foot-guards, and their respective habits, parades, and stations on the coronation day. III. The apparelling and robing of the King and Queen, and their majesties repairing to Westminster-Hall. IV. The marshalling and conducting into Westminster-Hall, the several persons who are to march in the procession. V. Their majesties entring the said hall, and the ceremony of presenting the regalia, &c. to the King. VI. The grand proceeding to the coronation, with the usual seating and placing of the several persons after their entrance into the church. VII. The usual ceremony of the coronations as performed in the church. VIII. The manner of their majesties return to Westminster-Hall. IX. The ceremony of the champion's challenge, and of the Heralds proclaiming the King's style in Latin, French, and English. X. A description of the royal and sacred ornaments, and of the crowns and scepters, &c. wherewith their majesties are crowned and invested; together with a brief history of the ancient chair, called St. Edward's chair, in which the King is crowned. XI. The ceremony of the proceedings at the coronations of King William and Queen Mary, of Queen Anne, and of His late Majesty King George I. By comparing which with the proceeding, history, the reader will be able to form a complete idea of the ceremonies which will be observed at the coronation of his present Majesty King George II. and his Royal Consort Queen Caroline. XII. A complete list of the lords spiritual and temporal, the knights of the most noble order of the Garter, and of the knights of the Bath; whereby the reader will have, at one view, most of the names of the illustrious persons who will have place in the grand solemnity of the coronation of their present majesties. XIII. A bill of fare at a former coronation-feast. With many other notable particulars, for which the reader is referred to the index. The whole adorn'd with curious cuts, representing on a copper-plate the manner of the champion's challenge, as also the imperial crowns, scepters, orb, Queen's circlet, the two pointed swords, and curtana, the Kings and Queen's rings, St. Edward's chair, &c. To which is also prefix'd very large and curious copper-plate, exhibiting (in that of King William and Queen Mary) the magnificent form of the procession usually observed in the coronation of the Kings and Queens of England
The second edition. / Cengage Gale / 2009
Ressources électroniques 6.
A complete account of the ceremonies observed in the coronations of the kings and queens of England. : Containing, I. The form of the royal letters of summons, sent to the Peers and Peeresses, to attend the Solemnity of the Coronation. II. The usual Disposition of the Horse and Foot-Guards, and their respective. Habits, Parades, and Stations on the Coronation-Day. III. The Apparelling and Robing of the King and Queen, and their Majesties repairing to Westminster-Hall. IV. The Marshalling and Conducting into Westminster-Hall, the several Persons who are to march in the Procession. V. Their Majesties Entring the said Hall, and the Ceremony of presenting the Regalia, &c. to the King. VI. The Grand Proceeding to the Coronation, with the usual Seating and Placing of the several Persons after their Entrance into the Church. Vii. The usual Ceremony of the Coronations as performed in the Church. Viii. The Manner of their Majesties Return to Westminster-Hall. IX. The Ceremony of the Champion's Challenge, and of the Heralds proclaiming the King's Style in Latin, French, and English. X. A Description of the Royal and Sacred Ornaments, and of the Crowns and Scepters, &c. wherewith their Majesties are crowned, and invested; together with a brief History of the Ancient Chair, called St. Edward's-Chair, in which the King is crowned. XI. The Ceremony of the Proceedings at the Coronation of King William and Queen Mary, of Queen Anne, and of his late Majesty King George I. By comparing which with the preceding History, the Reader will be able to form a complete Idea of the Ceremonies which will be observed at the Coronation of His present Majesty King George II and his Royal Consort Queen Caroline. XII. A complete List of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, the Knights of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, and of the Knights of the Bath; Whereby the Reader will have, at one View, most of the Names of the illustrious Persons who will have Place in the Grand Solemnity of the Coronation of Their Present Majesties. XIII. A bill of fare at a former coronation-feast. With many other notable particulars, for which the Reader is referred to the Index. The whole adorn'd with curious cuts, representing on a Copper-Plate the Manner of the Champion's Challenge, as also the Imperial Crowns, Scepters, Orb, Queen's Circler, the two pointed Swords, and Curtana, the King's and Queen's Rings, St. Edward's Chair, &c. To which is also prefix'd a very large and curious Copper-Plate, exhibiting (in that of King William and Queen Mary) the magnificent Form of the Procession usually observed in the Coronation of the Kings and Queens of England
The third edition. / Cengage Gale / 2009
Ressources électroniques 7.
A complete account of the ceremonies observed in the coronations of the kings and queens of England. : Containing, I. The Form of the Royal Letters of Summons, sent to the Peers and Peeresses, to attend the Solemnity of the Coronation. II. The usual Disposition of the Horse and Foot-Guards, and their respective Habits, Parades, and Stations on the Coronation-Day. III. The Apparelling and Robing of the King and Queen, and their Majesties repairing to Westminster-Hall. IV. The Marshalling and Conducting into Westminster-Hall, the several Persons who are to march in the Procession. V. Their Majesties Entring the said Hall, and the Ceremony of presenting the Regalia, &c. to the King. VI. The Grand Proceeding to the Coronation, with the usual Seating and Placing of the several Persons after their Entrance into the Church. Vii. The usual Ceremony of the Coronations as performed in the Church. Viii. The Manner of their Majesties Return to Westminster-Hall. IX. The Ceremony of the Champion's Challenge, and of the Heralds proclaiming the King's Style in Latin, French, and English. X. A Description of the Royal and Sacred Ornaments, and of the Crowns and Scepters, &c. wherewith their Majesties are crowned and invested; together with a brief History of the Ancient Chair, called St. Edward's-Chair, in which the King is crowned. XI The Ceremony of the Proceedings at the Coronations of King William and Queen Mary, of Queen Anne, and of his late Majesty King George I. By comparing which with the preceding History, the Reader will be able to form a complete Idea of the Ceremonies which will be observed at the Coronation of His present Majesty King George II. and his Royal Consort Queen Caroline. XII. A complete List of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, the Knights of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, and of the Knights of the Bath; Whereby the Reader will have, at one View, most of the Names of the illustrious Persons who will have Place in the Grand Solemnity of the Coronation of Their Present Majesties. XIII. A Bill of Fare at a former Coronation-Feast. With many other Notable Particulars, for which the Reader is referred to the Index. The whole Adorn'd with Curious Cuts, representing on a Copper-Plate the Manner of the Champion's Challenge, as also the Imperial Crowns, Scepters, Orb, Queen's Circles, the two pointed Swords, and Curtana, the King's and Queen's Rings, St. Edward's Chair, &c. To which is also prefix'd a very large and curious Copper-Plate, exhibiting (in that of King William and Queen Mary) the magnificent Form of the Procession usually observed in the Coronation of the Kings and Queens of England
Cengage Gale / 2009
Ressources électroniques 8.
Maitland, Frederic William (1850-1906) / Cengage Gale / 2009
Ressources électroniques 9.
Essex, : Suffolk, and Norfolk, Navigable Canal from London to Norwich and Lynn. By subscription, ready for the press, and speedily will be published, Price Five Shillings, half Bound, dedicated, by permission, to Thomas Bernay Brampston and John Bullock, Esqrs. Representatives for Essex; Sir John Rous, Bart. and Joshua Grigby, Esq. Representatives for Suffolk; Sir Edward Astley and Sir John Wodehouse, Barts. Representatives for Norfolk; a treatise addressed to the Nobility, Gentry, Land owners, Merchants, Traders, Farmers, and Manufacturers, of the Cities and Towns in those Counties, and also the City of London. Containing a full and particular account of the numerous advantages which will accrue to them, if a Navigable Canal was immediately cut from London through the interior parts of the above Counties to Norwich and Lynn. Pointing out The advantages which will accrue from such an undertaking, to the Kingdom in general, and to the Cities of London and Norwich, and Town of Lynn, in particular. As also to above sixty market and manufacturing Towns, and near seven hundred Villages, through and near which it is proposed to pass; which communication will always prevent a scarcity or monopoly of Corn or Coals in the London Market. Also, Shewing the amazing saving of land carriage, and the immense numbers of acres of land, now engrossed for growing of horse corn, only for horses employed in land carriage in these three Counties, which may be converted to other uses, as well as be the means of doubling, and in many places trebling, the value of land and produce, by a speedy, easy, and cheap conveyance to a market for consumption or exportation; and a certain and constant supply of oak timber for the royal navy, as 28,000 oak trees are proposed to be planted at proper distances, on the banks of the Canal. Including likewise, An estimate of the whole expence, and mode of raising the money necessary to carry it into execution, on the most easy, certain, and expeditious terms, and the extraordinary interest it will produce. As also a scheme for the repayment of the principal in a few years, and for rendering the shares of original Subscribers, a valuable and immense Freehold Income for ever. Illustrated with a Geographical whole sheet map of the passage which the proposed Canal is intended to take through the three Counties: As also with two views; the one of the Duke of Bridgewater's amazing Aquaduct over the River Irwell, in Lancashire, with his Grace's barges sailing thereon, forty feet above the river, and barges also passing under it, and on the river, at the same time: the other the view of the subterraneous passage of the great Staffordshire Canal above a mile under ground, at the great hill called Harecastle. The whole shewing the utility and importance of Inland Navigation. By an Essex Freeholder. At this present time, when the Princes of France, Poland, and Russia, are setting examples of this kind, for the promotion of commerce and agriculture, the Author flatters himself, the above work is not beneath the notice (if not of the Prince) at least of the present Prime Minister, the son of the immortal Chatham. Those Noblemen, Gentlemen, and others, who wish to promote and encourage this useful, instructing, and entertaining Treatise, are requested to transmit their Names as soon as possible, to the Printers of the Norwich, Ipswich, and Chelmsford News-Papers; Mr. Debrett, Bookseller, Piccadilly, or to Mr. Anrdews, Printer and Bookseller, No. 10, Little-Eastcheap, London; as it is intended only to print such a number as to answer the expected demand. N. B. No Subscription Money is desired till the Book is ready to be delivered, which will be on the first of December next at farthest, at which time the Book will be Delivered and the Subscription called for. - The Subscribers Names will be printed, if permitted
Phillips, John (1631-1706) / Cengage Gale / 2009
Livres 10.
Faulkner, Virginia (1913-1980) / 1st Bison Book ed. / University of Nebraska Press / 1974, cop. 1957